Useful Facts About Light Bulbs - LED, CFL and Incandescent Bulbs

Useful Facts About Light Bulbs – LED, CFL and Incandescent Bulbs

Useful Facts About Light Bulbs. I changed all the light bulbs at home both indoors as well as outside, enjoyed the workout (burned about 1000 calories) and learned a few things such as: 1) you can save a great deal of energy when you change to LEDs 2) you can use LEDs practically everywhere and 3) ‘warm white’ is better for your eyes when compared to ‘cool white’. As one moves from incandescent light bulbs to CFLs to LEDs you use less electricity and they last longer. Read on...

Useful Facts About Light Bulbs – The Real Winner is…

Incandescent bulbs and halogen bulbs have the highest wattage, making them less energy-efficient choices. CFL bulbs use fewer watts, but LED bulbs are the real winner in energy efficiency—an 8 or 9-watt LED bulb emits as much light as a 60-watt incandescent bulb.

Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent and LED Light Bulbs

Useful Facts About Light Bulbs - LED, CFL and Incandescent Bulbs - Incandescent Light Bulb
Incandescent Light Bulb

An incandescent light bulb, incandescent lamp or incandescent light globe is an electric light with a wire filament heated until it glows. The filament is enclosed in a glass bulb with a vacuum or inert gas to protect the filament from oxidation.

Useful Facts About Light Bulbs - LED, CFL and Incandescent Bulbs - Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL)
 Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL)

A compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), also called compact fluorescent light, energy-saving light and compact fluorescent tube, is a fluorescent lamp designed to replace an incandescent light bulb. The lamps use a tube which is curved or folded to fit into the space of an incandescent bulb. In a CFL, an electric current is driven through a tube containing argon and a small amount of mercury vapor. This generates invisible ultraviolet light that excites a fluorescent coating (called phosphor) on the inside of the tube, which then emits visible light.

Useful Facts About Light Bulbs - LED, CFL and Incandescent Bulbs - LRD
 Light-Emitting Diode (LED)

light-emitting diode, or LED for short, is a lamp that emits light in a very narrow band of wavelengths. Because of this, LED’s are far more energy efficient than incandescent or fluorescent lights, which emit light in a much wider band of wavelengths. LED’s produce light that renders a color similar (but not identical) to natural daylight, which is measured on a scale called CRI, or Color Rendering Index.

Warm white or Cool white?

Warm White is a yellowish that resembles a traditional incandescent or halogen light. Cool White leans towards shades of blue and more like the light you would get from a neon. While cool white looks great in modern kitchens and where the brighter the better, warm white works much better when you are looking for softer light. It’s particularly well suited to lounges, living rooms and the traditional kitchen, such as country styles, where the white light contrasts too much with the rest of the room. It’s a personal choice.

Is Cool White Light Bad for You?

The Australian National University found that overexposure to “cool” or “bright white” fluorescent bulbs for over 45 hours a week put your eyes at risk for many health issues, such as cataracts and pterygia.

Yellow Light: Which is Better for Your Eyes When Reading & Studying

Some people choose the yellow light for reading, but others prefer the white one as a better option. … Some experts claim that you should use a yellow color light below 3000 K on the colour temperature scale for night reading.

Useful Facts About Light Bulbs - LED, CFL and Incandescent Bulbs - The Colour Temperature is Measured in Kelvins (K)

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Sources:

Featured Photo by iSAW Company on Unsplash

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